Senate Approves Two Gun Measures out of nine

10:48 PM, Apr 18, 2013   |    comments
Photo: AP
  • Share
  • Print
  • - A A A +

By Brian Tumulty
Gannett Washington Bureau

WASHINGTON - The Senate voted Thursday to increase federal support for mental health services and to cut federal community policing grants by 5 percent to communities that reveal gun ownership data.

The two votes further muddied the picture on the future of gun legislation the day after the Senate rejected bipartisan measures to expand gun-related background checks and add new criminal penalties for illegal gun trafficking.

The measure to penalize communities that make gun ownership data public received 67 votes, seven more than the minimum required for passage. The mental health measure passed resoundingly, 95-2.

Among the measures that failed on Wednesday, the gun trafficking proposal fell just two votes short of the 60 required for passage.

Democratic Sens. Chuck Schumer and Kirsten Gillibrand of New York are among a core group of lawmakers who have supported the most stringent gun-control measures, including failed proposals to ban assault weapons and high-capacity ammunition clips.

BREAKOUT

Under Senate rules, all the gun-related amendments required 60 votes to pass.

- Background checks. Would have expanded background checks to include sales at gun shows and over the Internet while exempting family sales and other private transactions. Would have authorized $400 million to upgrade national background check database and reduce the time for completing background checks to one day within four years. Failed 54-46.
Schumer: Yes
Gillibrand: Yes
http://www.senate.gov/legislative/LIS/roll_call_lists/roll_call_vote_cfm.cfm?congress=113&session=1&vote=00097

- Background check alternative. Would have replaced the background checks proposal with alternative proposal emphasizing enforcement against individuals who lie on background check applications. Would have expanded background check system's records on people deemed mentally impaired. Failed 52-48.
Schumer: No
Gillibrand: No.
http://www.senate.gov/legislative/LIS/roll_call_lists/roll_call_vote_cfm.cfm?congress=113&session=1&vote=00098

- Trafficking. Would have added new criminal penalties for illegal gun trafficking and straw purchases. Failed 58-42.
Schumer: Yes
Gillibrand: Yes.
http://www.senate.gov/legislative/LIS/roll_call_lists/roll_call_vote_cfm.cfm?congress=113&session=1&vote=00099

 Concealed carry. Would have allowed gun-owners with a concealed-carry permit in one state to carry certain weapons in other states that have concealed-carry laws. Failed 57-43.
Schumer: No
Gillibrand: No.
http://www.senate.gov/legislative/LIS/roll_call_lists/roll_call_vote_cfm.cfm?congress=113&session=1&vote=00100

- Assault weapons. Would have banned certain assault weapons. Failed 40-60.
Schumer: Yes
Gillibrand: Yes.
http://www.senate.gov/legislative/LIS/roll_call_lists/roll_call_vote_cfm.cfm?congress=113&session=1&vote=00101

- Mental health. Would have required that a person must be deemed a danger to themselves or others in order to be banned from buying a gun. Designed to protect veterans' gun rights, according to supporters. Failed 56-44.
Schumer: No
Gillibrand: No
http://www.senate.gov/legislative/LIS/roll_call_lists/roll_call_vote_cfm.cfm?congress=113&session=1&vote=00102

- High-capacity magazines. Would have banned the sale of magazines and other devices holding more than 10 rounds of ammunition. Would have exempted .22 caliber rifles. Also would have exempted on- and off-duty police officers. Would have authorized federally funded gun buyback programs to purchase high-capacity magazines. Failed 46-54.
Schumer: Yes
Gillibrand: Yes.
http://www.senate.gov/legislative/LIS/roll_call_lists/roll_call_vote_cfm.cfm?congress=113&session=1&vote=00103

- Release of gun ownership data. Would withhold 5 percent of federal community policing grants to states and localities that release gun-ownership data. Passed 67-30.
Schumer: No
Gillibrand: No.
http://www.senate.gov/legislative/LIS/roll_call_lists/roll_call_vote_cfm.cfm?congress=113&session=1&vote=00104

- Mental health. Would expand federal mental health programs, including education, suicide prevention and trauma centers. Passed 95-2.
Schumer: Yes
Gillibrand: Yes.
http://www.senate.gov/legislative/LIS/roll_call_lists/roll_call_vote_cfm.cfm?congress=113&session=1&vote=00105

 

Most Watched Videos